Mar 072012
 

In conjunction with the Presenting Architecture Exhibition, the American Institute of Architects, San Francisco Chapter and the Center for Architecture + Design is also hosting Presenting Architecture’s first seminar series.  This series will give attendees a great insight to the world of how architecture gets presented from some of the top professionals in the Bay area.

Enter the promo code PRESENT to receive a discount off the General Admission price.

The Nature of Drawing – Chris Grubbs
April 6, 2012, 12pm-1pm, AIA SF, 130 Sutter Street, Suite 600 San Francisco
Chris’ board at the exhibition shows a full work up of his process in a Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial image.

Chris is one of the Bay areas most talented artists and conceptual designers.  Through a richly illustrated Powerpoint presentation, Chris will discuss the nature of drawing, and the critical role it plays in helping us see more clearly and be better designers.

Christopher Grubbs’ illustration career began as a student, drawing for R. Buckminster Fuller’s “Old Man River” domed city project for East Saint Louis, Illinois. He has drawn for the National September 11 Memorial, New York, the Walt Disney Family Foundation Library, Crissy Field in San Francisco, master plans for historic Charleston, the Grand Canyon Village Interpretive Center, Beijing Financial District, Shanghai Riverfront, Hong Kong, Washington D.C. and the 2000 Sydney Olympics. His drawing skills have lead him to become a design consultant at Yellowstone National Park, for New Orlean’s Broadmoor neighborhood, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial in Washington D.C., and major urban master plans throughout China. A Visiting Assistant Professor at Washington University in Saint Louis, he has lectured and held workshops at Colorado State University, Montana State University, Rhode Island School of Design, the University of California at Berkeley.  Click to sign up.

Workshop Tour – Gemmiti Model Art
April 12, 3:30-5pm, Space is limited to 15, location to be provided on sign up.

Gemmiti Model Art is located in the Mission District of San Francisco.  Occupying an 8,600 square foot fully-renovated studio in a warehouse that was originally built to assemble WWII aircraft. Gemmiti Model Art was founded in San Francisco in 1999 by Lisa Gemmiti.  Lisa has dedicated her career, since 1979, to the production and use of physical scale models for a wide variety of purposes serving many industries.The Model Making studio includes:

a design studio
an assembly shop
an equipment area (with 2 CNC machines and full compliment of shop equipment)
a laser room (with 2 laser cutters)
a host of miniature machine tools, specially made for model making hardware and stock materials areas
a fully-stocked landscaping area
a custom model tree making
a vacuum forming area
a sand blasting area
a mold making and casting area
a paint room
a photo studio
and a Model Art™ gallery

Lisa Gemmiti will personally guide us through this amazing facility an share some amazing stories of some of her more unique projects. Click to sign up.

Presenting Architecture: What works for clients, the press and the public.
Moderated by Amanda Walter
Panelists: John King, Lydia Lee, Jonathan Stern, Frank Doyle, Phil Woods.
 
April 25, 2012, 11:30 Registration and Light Lunch, 12pm – 1pm Discussion
AIA SF, 130 Sutter Street, Suite 600 San Francisco

Accurately communicating design ideas is crucial for architects. How you present your design informs an impression that is often impossible to reverse. Whether built or unbuilt, your design story can be told in many ways and through many vehicles. Join us on April 25th when we turn the tables. A panel of clients, the press, bloggers and public stakeholders present their feedback about what has worked, hasn’t worked, what they’d really like to see. This interactive lunch-time event is your chance to learn new ways of getting your ideas understood – the first time.

 

John King is the urban design writer for The San Francisco Chronicle.  John will be signing his book Cityscapes: San Francisco and Its Buildings at the event as well!  You can purchase the book from our sponsor William Stout Books here: http://www.stoutbooks.com/cgi-bin/stoutbooks.cgi/87674.html.

 

 

 

Lydia Lee is the managing editor of Remodelista, the influential interior design and architecture website. A longtime design and architecture writer, Lee previously served as the San Francisco editor for The Architect’s Newspaper.

Phil Woods, AIA, AICP is currently the Director of Physical & Environmental Planning, Physical Planning Design & Construction at University of California, Merced.  Having positions with the Cities of Concord and City of Palo Alto along with experience as a practicing architect, Phil has had countless projects presented to him and will share some of those experiences.

Jonathan Stern directs the development group at the Port of San Francisco, negotiating public/private real estate development agreements on San Francisco’s piers and adjacent waterfront development.  Mr. Stern’s projects include the implementation of large scale, mixed-use commercial, recreational and industrial projects.  Currently Mr. Stern is leading the efforts to complete the Exploratorium at Piers 15 and 17, as well as negotiations for Lot A at ATT Park (seawall lot 337) and the Port’s site at Washington and The Embarcadero (seawall lot 351).  Additionally, he is leading development partner solicitation efforts for Pier 70.  Before joining the Port, Mr. Stern was principal at Bay Area Economics – an economic planning and real estate development consulting firm.  At BAE he helped evaluate potential public/private development partnerships and provide market and real estate perspectives for sites throughout Northern California and beyond.

Frank Doyle is currently a Councilman for the Town of Tiburon and Founder & Creative Director for the Standingstone Group, brand design consultants. Formerly a Senior Creative Director at SGI.

Moderator Amanda Walter co-authored Social Media in Action: Comprehensive Guide for Architecture, Engineering, Planning and Environmental Consulting Firms   |   www.social-media-in-action.com and will have books available for signing.

Click to sign up.

For more information and to sign up for a seminar, please visit www.aiasf.org/Programs.htm

Social Media Links:

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This exhibit is sponsored by Arch , GCI General Contractors and William Stout Architectural Books.

Proudly hosted by the American Institute of Architects, San Francisco Chapter and the Center for Architecture + Design.


Oct 182011
 

Discussing the importance of  presentations is a priority for a website and blog dedicated to promoting the specialists who provide their clients great architectural presentations.  The concept of how presentation matters and impacts of both winning and losing presentations is sure to be the subject of many blogs and discussions on the site.  I had intended the initial blog on Presenting Architecture to be on this topic but am happy I waited as the presentation I am starting off with has much to discuss.

A recent article I found through Archnewsnow.com was a criticism of Frank Gehry’s proposed Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial on the National Mall in Washington DC. Avoiding everything related to the design of what was presented, the proposal has not gone over well and actually spurred a public competition sponsored by the National Civic Art Society (skewed towards conservative design) of alternative ideas for what the Memorial should be. The juxtaposition of how Gehry’s office presented and what the public threw out there in the competition highlights what I view as cold presentations verses warm presentations.

Let’s take a look at what was presented from both Gehry’s office and some of the competition entries.

First a video from Todd C Wiggins showing the Gehry presentation.

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The Gehry presentation showing the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission studying the model and some presentation images onscreen.  This picture really shows why models are still used, they facilitate a discussion at which everyone can see, point and talk about the project.

While the model clearly helped Gehry present the design to an audience, the photos of it that were used seem cold and the scale of the project is difficult to understand.  Almost no information about building materials or even clues were given.  Although still early on in the design, a hint of materials not just a child’s building blocks and better pedestrian level views would help viewers understand the pedestrian experience.

     ikegehrycrap.jpg

Was it a surprise that the reaction to the presentation was bad?  No, this concept was simply not presented in its best light.

Here are a few of the competition entries, most well presented, put together with substantially fewer resources than Gehry most likely had.  They present a warm feel that is easily understandable to the general public.

 Sylvester Bartos and Whitley Esteban

 Scott Collison

In contrast, to the Gehry proposal above, below is an early concept illustration by Presenting Architecture member Chris Grubbs of the recently dedicated Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial. The completed Memorial is close to what Chris illustrated in such a wonderful way which was presented and approved early on.

        REUTERS/Jason Reed

What I view as the good and bad of each presentation are of course my opinion, you are invited to add your own observations in the comment area at the bottom.  Please try and focus on the presentations, not the designs.